Legends of Kernow 2: The Crawling Chaos: Act the Fourth

Sometimes the legends are true.
Lewis' campaign using Chill/The Beast Within rules. Cornwall in the Year of Our Lord 1699 - a land unto itself, a county of wild coasts, desolate moors, haunted tin-mines, drowned kingdoms, secret valleys, wreckers, ghosts, highwaymen, pirates, piskies and just maybe... the last of the giants!
User avatar
Lewis
Epic Level 25
Posts: 538
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2012 8:40 pm
Location: Secret Lair, in a cavern somewhere beneath Telford.

Legends of Kernow 2: The Crawling Chaos: Act the Fourth

Postby Lewis » Mon Apr 01, 2013 9:55 am

Legends of Kernow 2: The Crawling Chaos: Act the Fourth – The Dead Shall Walk


“When there is no more room in Hell, the dead shall walk the earth.” (George A. Romero)

“The hour is coming, in which all that are in the graves shall hear his voice, and shall come forth; they that have done evil." (The Gospel According to St. John 5:28-29)

“Hell delivered up the dead which were in it." (The Revelation of St. John the Divine, 20:13)

“The earth shall cast out the dead, dead men shall live and with dead bodies shall they arise. Shut thy doors about thee and hide thyself. For the Lord cometh to punish the inhabitants of the earth.” (The Book of the Prophet Isaiah 26: 19-21)



Faced with a walking, burning corpse, Lord Robert understandably loses his nerve. However, this is only a momentary lapse in courage and the aristocrat rushes back into the burning orphanage and up the stairs – which are in imminent danger of collapse. Thomas Gallowglass arrives shortly after and follows his master – barely making it up the stairs before they collapse. In the heat and the choking smoke, the two men desperately search for orphans to rescue.

Outside, drawn by the urgent clanging of the church bell and the light of the flames, their companions arrive. First on the scene is Mr. Barebones, who spots four more shambling corpses emerging from the churchyard. He warns the handful of good folk of Helston who have formed a bucket chain from a nearby horse trough, to throw water upon the blazing orphanarium. Faced with the dead rising from their graves, most of the townspeople panic and flee, leaving one poor chap, braver than most, vainly hurling water at the inferno.

Armynel, Eva and Mr. Blackwell arrive, and in the smoky darkness and confusion do not realise the danger until the shambling cadavers are upon them. A desperate fight takes place, until well placed or lucky shots or blows to the head bring down most of the corpses. Those brought down without a blow to the head suddenly get up again.

Meanwhile, Lord Robert and his bodyguard brave the choking smoke and blistering heat as long as they can, hurling orphans from the upper storey. Mr Barebones catches them. Well, most of them. Well, some of them. Then the two heroes are forced to make their own escape. Lord Robert is stunned and Mr Gallowglass lands badly. However, the Irishman is not down for long and rushes forward to decapitate and dispatch the last animated corpse with a well-aimed sword strike.

In the day that follows our plucky band examine the graveyard and discover (a) the corpses appear to have dug their own way out of their graves and (b) someone has been harvesting plants that grew upon graves. The investigators search the church and the vicarage, but it appears Rev Trescothick has vanished. There is an overturned pew in the church and they find a letter from The Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell thanking the cleric for some unspecified help, and a handwritten note, perhaps a biblical quotation: “When there is no more room in Hell, the dead shall walk the earth.” Upon later comparing this to notations for his sermons, Eva determines that this is the missing vicar's handwriting and that he was in an excited state at the time he wrote it.

Mr. Blackwell eventually thinks to visit their host, Dr. Alan Ty Thorpe. The good doctor is quite excited about a new book he has got his hands on and thinks it may be of use to the investigators. The book is a German grimoire, written in Latin and called Instrumenta Hostis or to give the work its common English title - Devices of the Enemy.

Dr. Thorpe is also able to explain the lack of the Vicar of St. Michael's – apparently Rev. Trescothick had to leave urgently with some friends. Lord Robert is not convinced, thinking that maybe the ringing of the church bell somehow summoned the dead to rise. His companions with more knowledge of occult lore demur. They reckon that this was caused by a monster or a black magician, using a low-level discipline of the Evil Way. Whoever did this would have been a student of such disciplines and would have had to be within sight of the graves and could have given the animated corpses only fairly simple instructions.

As they recuperate and prepare for the Flora Day and Hal-an-Tow, several members of the group avidly study Devices of the Enemy. There is much discussion about whether they can take the risk to use the dark powers spelt out in the book – although risky, this could give them more powerful tools to use to defeat evil.

So, are they brave and strong enough to use evil to fight evil?


Note: all Biblical quotations are taken from the Authorised King James Version, naturally. I could also quote other scriptures such as the Q'ran, but for the setting and atmosphere of Legends of Kernow, it just has to be the KJV!

Playing: Telford: Star Wars.
Running: Cannock: Legends of Corwyn/D&D, Telford: Forgotten Realms: Heroes of Faerûn/D&D.
Prepping: Spycraft: Deniables

User avatar
Lewis
Epic Level 25
Posts: 538
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2012 8:40 pm
Location: Secret Lair, in a cavern somewhere beneath Telford.

Re: Legends of Kernow 2: Devices of the Enemy (grimoire)

Postby Lewis » Mon Apr 01, 2013 10:02 am

INSTRUMENTA HOSTIS

Appearance: A leather-bound book, printed on good quality paper. It is written in Latin.

History: Originally written in Latin, in Germany around 1500, this copy would appear to have been printed on a Gutenberg-style press in Leipzig in 1560. It has a rather long-winded title in Latin which translates as Being a Treatise Upon ye Way of Evil, and ye Dark Disciples and ye Many Insidious Devices of ye Enemy. It is that last phrase (Instrumenta Hostis in Latin) that gives the work its common English title - Devices of the Enemy.

Contents:

(1) A chapter discussing a prophecy of a coming battle against the forces of Darkness. It is foretold that the Devil will attempt to throw open the gates of Hell. Preceding this he will send his most powerful servant to prepare the way. This figure is variously referred to as “The Deceiver”, “The Betrayer”, "The Black Wind", "The Crawling Mist", “The Black Bishop”, "Nyarlathotep", "The Dweller in Darkness" or “The Dark Disciple”. The author makes a rather unconvincing case that this figure is actually Judas Iscariot, released from Hell on a mission for the Devil.

(2) Sections on various supernatural creatures, discussing their natures, powers and potential methods for defeating or destroying them. The latter seem rather far-fetched and often contradictory. The creatures include: common forms of the Faerie, the Wamphyre (a type of blood-sucking monster common to the Carpathian mountains of Central Europe), Lycanthropes or Were-wolves, known since Classical times and Unquiet Spirits of the Dead (Common Ghosts).

(3) How magicians, conjurers and witches do use the disciplines of the evil way (how they gain an EWS) and detailed instructions on how to cast several disciplines (with repeated warnings about the terrible risks to the ultimate fate of your immortal soul if you choose to follow this path). The disciplines included are: Change Self, Contact the Living, Second Light, Sleep, Steal Memory, Swarm, Wave of Fog and Write.

Playing: Telford: Star Wars.
Running: Cannock: Legends of Corwyn/D&D, Telford: Forgotten Realms: Heroes of Faerûn/D&D.
Prepping: Spycraft: Deniables


Return to “Legends of Kernow”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest